thecyberwolf:

Mario Dreams
Created by Ken Wong
Follow him on his Website - Facebook - Twitter
Buy this print on INPRNT

thecyberwolf:

Mario Dreams

Created by Ken Wong

Follow him on his Website - Facebook - Twitter

Buy this print on INPRNT

149 notes

Four paralysed men have been able to move their legs for the first time in years after electrical stimulation of their spinal cords, US doctors report.

A report, in the journal Brain, suggests the electricity makes the spinal cord more receptive to the few messages still arriving from the brain.

234 notes

vgjunk:

Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle Stadium, Super Famicom.

'Brown Bunny' recut?

vgjunk:

Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle Stadium, Super Famicom.

'Brown Bunny' recut?

456 notes

theatlantic:

Google Is Trying to Trademark the Word ‘Glass’—and It’s in Good Company

Apple has tried to trademark “startup.” Facebook has tried to trademark “book.” 
Read more. [Image: Google]


D1ck5!

theatlantic:

Google Is Trying to Trademark the Word ‘Glass’—and It’s in Good Company

Apple has tried to trademark “startup.” Facebook has tried to trademark “book.” 

Read more. [Image: Google]

D1ck5!

143 notes

digg:

I’ll have what she’s having. (via)


I’m an iced americano guy. There is no home for this vagabond.

digg:

I’ll have what she’s having. (via)

I’m an iced americano guy. There is no home for this vagabond.

353 notes

iheartchaos:

Some afternoon retro Disney nightmare fuel for ya.

iheartchaos:

Some afternoon retro Disney nightmare fuel for ya.

89 notes

jtotheizzoe:

Let This Awesome Science Infect Your Mind

Ed Yong is one of the finest science writers in the world. His National Geographic blog is chock full of the weird, wild, and WTF-inducing stories that make our living world so darn interesting. So I was overjoyed when I heard he would be speaking at this year’s TED.

He didn’t disappoint. In his talk above, he unlocks the under-appreciated and often cringe-worthy world of mind-controlling parasites. They get no respect, I tell ya, no respect at all. Yet they are cornerstones of countless ecosystems, determining food availability and managing population sizes like armies of freaky fauna, each deployed in a Trojan Horse of evolution’s design. Every parasite’s life is a story, by definition, an elaborate chain that extends from host to host, and I think they’ve found their minstrel in Ed. I mean that as a compliment, of course.

Listen to him weave a tapestry of tapeworms, explain what makes flamingos munch on zombie shrimp, show you how a cricket is like a TARDIS, how a wasp turns a cockroach into a cocker spaniel, and how a brain-controlling protozoan reminds him of an Elizabeth Gilbert novel. My favorite part of this? The idea that ideas themselves may be parasites.

I haven’t loved a TED talk this much in a long time. Or maybe that’s just the parasite talking. 

Good inspiration for some zombie fiction.

1,254 notes

erikkwakkel:

Cat paws in medieval book - again

This great image was brought to my attention by the archivist at Balliol College, Oxford (here is his tweet). In a similar case, an image I tweeted some time ago showed a trail of inky cat paws, which was sent to me by @EmirOFilipovic (here is that tweet). The Balliol manuscript again provides evidence of cats walking over books, in this case in a manuscript from the 15th-century. It’s lovely to see that cats walking over books is a universal practice, with currently two medieval cases identified. In the image above the cat appears to merely have had dirt on his feet, not ink. It’s hard to say when this intrusion happened, but it will likely have been before modern times. Cats are, after all, refused entry to library reading rooms.

Pic: Oxford, Balliol College, MS 192 (England, 15th century).

1,178 notes